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Posted: October 19, 2014, 11:37 pm
Back in 94, 95, I remember quite a few wolf mounts being brought in to put in shops for sale and I remember a few people were claiming they were "Yellowstone" wolves, which at that point in history, was not true, it was just shop keepers trying to make a buck, we get it up here in the shops around Glacier as well. I know a couple of shops down in that area that also have "Yellowstone" Grizzly bears, that were actually taken in Alaska.

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Sun Oct 19, 2014 4:37 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 11:11 pm
Dave Parker wrote:
Connie wrote: (I know you'll take a swing at me for this statement, Dave, but that's how I felt.)


No I won't Connie, we each have our feelings, I am sorry it upset you, but if I remember right that is not a Yellowstone wolf, it has been there for quite a few years.

Dave

:)

Statistics: Posted by Connie — Sun Oct 19, 2014 4:11 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 9:12 pm
Connie wrote:
(I know you'll take a swing at me for this statement, Dave, but that's how I felt.)


No I won't Connie, we each have our feelings, I am sorry it upset you, but if I remember right that is not a Yellowstone wolf, it has been there for quite a few years.

Dave

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Sun Oct 19, 2014 2:12 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 8:04 pm
Back in June while in Jackson, Wy., I was surprised to see beautiful stuffed and mounted wolves priced for several thousand dollars. I was fighting back tears as I walked out of the store. (I know you'll take a swing at me for this statement, Dave, but that's how I felt.)

Statistics: Posted by Connie — Sun Oct 19, 2014 1:04 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 6:11 pm
Steve wrote:
MGoBlue wrote:Point taken, Dave and Steve. And I had forgotten about the well known saying about why dog sleds are better than snowmobiles in the Arctic: You can't eat your snowmobile.

Dave, my hat's off to those three families for abiding by the principle of "eat what you kill." Another reason why I personally wouldn't shoot a wolf! ;)

Actually, I'm with the reverend on this one, "Good heavens!"


There are lots of places in the world, that canine meat is eaten as well as horse meat, here in the US, many seem to have a problem with eating those meats. There are some places I have been in the world, that I can't tell you what meat we had for dinner.

:o

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Sun Oct 19, 2014 11:11 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 4:11 pm
MGoBlue wrote:
Point taken, Dave and Steve. And I had forgotten about the well known saying about why dog sleds are better than snowmobiles in the Arctic: You can't eat your snowmobile.

Dave, my hat's off to those three families for abiding by the principle of "eat what you kill." Another reason why I personally wouldn't shoot a wolf! ;)

Actually, I'm with the reverend on this one, "Good heavens!"

Statistics: Posted by Steve — Sun Oct 19, 2014 9:11 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 3:15 pm
Point taken, Dave and Steve. And I had forgotten about the well known saying about why dog sleds are better than snowmobiles in the Arctic: You can't eat your snowmobile.

Dave, my hat's off to those three families for abiding by the principle of "eat what you kill." Another reason why I personally wouldn't shoot a wolf! ;)

Statistics: Posted by MGoBlue — Sun Oct 19, 2014 8:15 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 2:37 pm
object

Statistics: Posted by Steve — Sun Oct 19, 2014 7:37 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 1:59 pm
Very sad to hear about the shooting of another Yellowstone wolf or any wolf at all at least in my opinion. I am sure it won't be the last one to fall.

People hunt wolves because that is what they want to do. Doesn't matter what their reason is, a trophy mount, to destroy a competing predator, wolf meat for the freezer or just pure hatred. And the thing is people are always going to put their desires and needs over any and all other species. They just take what they want. There is no compromising in the human species. They want and take it all. They just cannot live in harmony with the other creatures they share the earth with. Hell, they can't live in harmony with their fellow humans. To me it is a very sad situation. A few good people go against the grain but in the long term it is a losing battle. Very depressing.

Statistics: Posted by Robert Bunch — Sun Oct 19, 2014 6:59 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 3:41 am
Retired, I love wolves and would not hunt them myself, but I believe the main motivation for most people who do hunt them is that they believe wolves reduce the numbers of deer, elk, etc. (I think it's hard to argue against that notion.) They believe killing wolves reduces competition, providing humans with better hunting for ungulates, which is what they really care about.

I can't imagine anyone eating a wolf, but they wouldn't be left to rot by anyone whom I would consider a hunter. They are skinned and mounted.

I don't think there would be much resistance to the concept of a no-wolf-hunting zone around the perimeter of Yellowstone/GTNP if it weren't for the fact that a lot of people (hunters, guides, outfitters, entire communities) want there to be good elk hunting in that area.

Statistics: Posted by MGoBlue — Sat Oct 18, 2014 8:41 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 3:33 am
Retired,

I know 11 different people who have taken wolves legally in the state of Montana, all of them have full body mounts of the wolves and I know three families that have butchered the wolves and have turned them into roasts. As far as hunting wolves, this subject has been discussed at great length in the past on here and numerous other blogs and websites and just as any other wildlife, wolves are legal game animals once they leave the Park, the lines are drawn, just as they are with deer, elk, moose, sheep. I seriously doubt you will ever see the park expanded to included a buffer zone around the park. There are no buffer zones around any National park in the country and with the current trends, in the future there might not be any federal lands outside of the national parks!

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Sat Oct 18, 2014 8:33 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 2:49 am
I have never understood why individuals want to kill Yellowstone wolves. If wolves are destroying livestock, killing them I understand. But ...... to kill wolves that venture out of the park for the sport of killing them just does not make sense to me.

Other than prairie dogs, and a few other small critters, everything that my friends and I used to shoot was something we could skin, process, and eat. Do people that kill wolves eat the meat? If they don't eat it, then what the heck do they do with the carcass? Perhaps they skin the wolf and have a rug, or a wall hanger, made of the skin (or is it hide?) Perhaps they have a taxidermist make a wall mount out of the wolf's head?

Skinning a wolf must be an interesting affair. It must be closely akin to skinning a dog. Skinning a dog is at the very end of my list of things I am likely to do.

OK, enough out of me. Hopefully, if anyone has shot a Yellowstone wolf they will respond. Did you skin the wolf? Did you eat the meat? What did you do with the skin (or hide)? Did you have a mount made of the wolf's head or entire body?
I am serious about this. I would like to read a response from anyone that killed a Yellowstone wolf.

Statistics: Posted by Retired — Sat Oct 18, 2014 7:49 pm


Posted: October 18, 2014, 7:00 am
Legend of Lamar Valley Facebook Page reports:

"With a heavy heart I have to inform you we have had Montana MFW&P validate a Yellowstone National Park wolf has been killed. In Unit 316.
The JB *Drab Grey* yearling female has been lost to the 2014 hunt.
She is the first park wolf to fall this season.
She has been missing for awhile and now we know why.

We have got to get a safe zone around the park...we just have to.
~ Jann"

https://www.facebook.com/LegendOfLamarValley

Statistics: Posted by Connie — Sat Oct 18, 2014 12:00 am


Posted: October 8, 2014, 1:01 pm
From the October 6 NPS Morning Report

Three cases regarding the illegal use of unmanned aircraft in Yellowstone National Park have resulted in three convictions.

Donald Criswell of Molalla, Oregon, was charged with violating the ban after he flew his unmanned aircraft over the crowded Midway Geyser Basin and close to bison on August 19th. He pled guilty to the charge of violating a closure and was fined $1,000 plus court costs.
In late September, Theodorus Van Vliet of the Netherlands entered a guilty plea in connection with an August 2nd incident in which his unmanned aircraft crashed into Grand Prismatic Spring. He was fined $1,000 and ordered to pay over $2,200 in restitution.
Earlier in September, Andreas Meissner of Germany pled guilty to charges arising from operating an unmanned aircraft which crashed into Yellowstone Lake near the West Thumb Marina back on July 18th. Meissner was sentenced to a one year ban from the park, was placed on one year of unsupervised probation, and was ordered to pay over $1,600 in fines and restitution.
All three successfully prosecuted cases arose from well documented violations of the prohibition on the operation of unmanned aircraft in park along with other violations of park regulations or impacts to park resources.
The regulation was enacted due to the conflict or impact with a variety of park uses, including disturbance of wildlife, impacts or damage to sensitive geothermal areas, and the creation of public safety hazards posed by their unregulated use. The ban is contained in the 2014 update to the Superintendent’s Compendium, which can be found online at http://go.usa.gov/mzRV.
In addition, Director Jarvis signed a policy memorandum in late June that directs superintendents nationwide to prohibit launching, landing, or operating unmanned aircraft on lands and waters administered by the National Park Service.
As these three instances illustrate, park rangers are enforcing the ban on unmanned aircraft operation in Yellowstone National Park. Violators could be subject to a mandatory court appearance, confiscation of their unmanned aircraft, and if found guilty could be subject to fines and other penalties.
[Submitted by Al Nash, Public Affairs Officer]

Statistics: Posted by kdboregon — Wed Oct 08, 2014 6:01 am


Posted: October 3, 2014, 6:21 pm
Meanwhile back at the ranch...
Wolf hunting is still illegal in Wyoming and wolves are still political pawns as well...
Now one of Matt Mead's challengers is saying what he would do - go smoke pot in Colorado and shoot a wolf anyway...

There's a way to win an election in Wyoming - defy an ESA Listing (promote SSS). Says a lot...

http://trib.com/lifestyles/recreation/wills-wants-wolf-hunt-despite-federal-order/article_550a43c9-5d51-53a8-941d-723b73f7289c.html

Statistics: Posted by Colorado_Dave — Fri Oct 03, 2014 11:21 am


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