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Posted: April 23, 2014, 4:50 am
ynp4me wrote:
Honestly, we're all more likely to die from other causes.

If I were around for the YNP Supervolcano... it's a hard
call... Do I cue REM's "It's the end of the World as
we know It..." and dance around... or play Aerosmith's
"Dream On" when it's turns out to be a smaller
hydrothermal eruption? :D

Never thought about what to put in the cd player, but Bad Moon on the Rise by CCR might be good, or Dust in the Wind by Kansas would probably be more appropriate. :lol:

Statistics: Posted by Hayden Valley Girl — Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:50 pm


Posted: April 23, 2014, 4:01 am
Honestly, we're all more likely to die from other causes.

If I were around for the YNP Supervolcano... it's a hard
call... Do I cue REM's "It's the end of the World as
we know It..." and dance around... or play Aerosmith's
"Dream On" when it's turns out to be a smaller
hydrothermal eruption? :D

Statistics: Posted by ynp4me — Tue Apr 22, 2014 9:01 pm


Posted: April 23, 2014, 3:55 am
His behavior is poor. In one report it states his dog was
chained. Sigh... It's beyond property rights.

Yellowstone was a National Park before Montana was a
state. What kind of person continues this sort of behavior
for decades?

Bill Hoppe is ethically bankrupt.

Statistics: Posted by ynp4me — Tue Apr 22, 2014 8:55 pm


Posted: April 22, 2014, 12:43 am
It would not be necessary to plow any roads. Why not put them on snow coaches or better yet snowmobiles. Then they could justify the money they spend on avalanche contol out the east entrance.

Statistics: Posted by Hayden Valley Girl — Mon Apr 21, 2014 5:43 pm


Posted: April 21, 2014, 11:52 pm
This posting brings to the forefront a factual scenario that would make an excellent bar examination question. In this case the solution suggested by following the letter of the law would appear impractical.

Does the State of Wyoming have to pay for Mammoth residents to send their children to public schools in the State of Montana? The answer to this question is almost certainly, "No". Having said that, it might be cheaper for the State of Wyoming to send these children to Montana public schools than to pay for Wyoming's existing dual obligations to educate these children and to pay for the cost of their transportation. Almost certainly the Gardiner school option would appear cheaper than the combined cost of Wyoming's paying for the cost of education/transportation and the NPS paying for the cost of keeping some road open year round so that the children would be able to attend existing Wyoming public schools.

Wyoming's statutes provide: 1) A child in Wyoming has the right to attend (Wyoming) public schools free of charge, Wyoming Code 21-4-103; 2) Children who are isolated have the right to have the State of Wyoming pay for their transportation (to a Wyoming public school) if their parents can show that their living in an isolated area is a financial necessity, Wyoming Code 21-4-401. Both of these statutes would apply to children living in Mammoth.

Wyoming could meet its obligation under its own statutes if it: 1) Built a K-12 school in Mammoth on land purchased from the federal government; 2) Operated a K-12 school on property rented from the federal government or 3) Offered to pay for daily transportation of school children to an existing public school in Wyoming.

Of course, the U.S. Government is also a sovereign. Accordingly, the U.S. Government could deny Wyoming the use of federal facilities In Mammoth to educate Wyoming school children. If this happened only alternative number 3 would be left. But, if the NPS persisted in exercising federal sovereignty, the parents or State of Wyoming could force the NPS to incur considerable expense by forcing at least one road to remain open year-round.

The little discussed Constitutional right to travel was first articulated by the U.S. Supreme Court in Crandall v. Nevada, 73 U.S. 35 (1868).In Kent v. Dulles, 357 US 116, 125, the Court stated: "The right to travel is a part of the liberty of which the citizen cannot be deprived without due process of law under the 5th Amendment."

In Chicago Motor Coach v. Chicago 169 NE 22, the Court stated, "Even the legislature has no power to deny to a citizen the right to travel upon the highway and transport his property in the ordinary course of his business or pleasure, though this right might be regulated in accordance with the public interest and convenience".

If the federal government refused to allow the use of its Mammoth facilities to teach school children, the case law suggests that either the State of Wyoming or parents would be able to successfully argue in court that the right of children to travel on highways to attend public school was a "fundamental right". This would, in turn, force the Park Service to figure out which route they wanted to keep plowed in the winter so as to allow their children to attend Wyoming public schools.

The Ken Burns documentary on Lewis and Clark may have been the first to coin the phrase, "The geography of reality". Through 1805 all the literature had spoken of an all-water route through North America commonly referred to as "The Northwest Passage". All of the "experts" of the day believed that such a route existed. A year and a half after slogging up the Missouri River fighting the current the entire way, Lewis came up against the geography of reality. The geography of reality was called the Bitterroot Range an almost impenetrable cluster of mountains. The Bitterroots were clearly not an all-water route across the continent.

In this case, the geography of reality is that it is a long, long bus ride from Mammoth Village to the nearest school in Wyoming or even the nearest spot in Wyoming that is not on federal land. It is about 134 miles from Mammoth to Cody via the Beartooth and the Chief Joe. It is about 126 miles from Mammoth to Cody via Sylvan Pass. Of course, it would be a lot cheaper for the NPS to plow the 15 miles between Cooke City and the Chief Joe than the 78 miles between Mammoth and East Gate. Either way the Mammoth kids would find themselves riding a school bus about four to six hours each day to attend an existing Wyoming public school.

Accordingly, this would seem to be the rare case where following the letter of the law would work a hardship on everyone. Wyoming is stuck with the cost of educating and transporting the kids. The NPS is stuck with the cost of keeping the Beartooth open if it won't let the State of Wyoming use existing facilities in Mammoth for a school. The Mammoth kids are stuck with one long bus ride five days a week. Because I think it would cost Wyoming more to educate and transport the kids in Wyoming schools than in Gardiner, I think they should pick up part of the tab. Because I think it would cost the NPS more to keep 15 miles of the Beartooth open all winter than to educate the kids in Gardiner I think it too should pick up part of the tab. Because the Gardiner parents don't want to deal with all of the issues involved with having their children attend public schools over a hundred miles away, I think they should have to pay a little too.

Of course, since the proposed solution would save taxpayer dollars and keep school children away from snowy mountain roads and certain life-long addictions to 5-hour Energy, no one will go along with it. I'll be interested to see how this all plays out. Keep us posted.

Statistics: Posted by grizynp — Mon Apr 21, 2014 4:52 pm


Posted: April 21, 2014, 8:39 pm
Maybe you should send up the bat signal for photodude - his looks like this:

Image

Statistics: Posted by Colorado_Dave — Mon Apr 21, 2014 1:39 pm


Posted: April 20, 2014, 2:49 pm
Never mind--deleted by me.

Edited by me:

For those who do not know what synath..........means: Here's a definition of my new, unknown ailment/affliction:

[b]Synesthesia (also spelled synæsthesia or synaesthesia, from the ancient Greek σύν [syn], "together", and αἴσθησις [aisthēsis], "sensation") is a neurological phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway[/b]

I wonder if I can pick some winning lottery numbers now??

Statistics: Posted by mywolvesrock/Charles — Sun Apr 20, 2014 7:49 am


Posted: April 20, 2014, 1:51 pm
Yes, as a matter of fact he does. It makes it much more interesting when everyone in the room can hear what your writing and they can look up all the BIG works you like to interject in your sentences to impress everyone!

Statistics: Posted by larryrainey — Sun Apr 20, 2014 6:51 am


Posted: April 20, 2014, 4:08 am
larryrainey wrote:
He's probably just tired of hearing your opinion!

Hearing my written opinions? Does he read out loud to himself or have a form of synesthesia?

Statistics: Posted by Biff — Sat Apr 19, 2014 9:08 pm


Posted: April 20, 2014, 1:33 am
He's probably just tired of hearing your opinion!

Statistics: Posted by larryrainey — Sat Apr 19, 2014 6:33 pm


Posted: April 20, 2014, 1:27 am
mywolvesrock/Charles wrote:
Good Grief!!! The topic is the death of 3 bison illegally killed by some idiot in the park. Are you even concerned about that, Biff, or had you just rather argue to be arguing???

A peaceful and meaningful Good Friday to each of you.


I always find it amusing that the person that someone disagrees with is labelled as the one who argues unreasonably. I have thought about the situation, suggested some explanations and offered some solutions for future prevention as well as tried to respond rationally to opposing arguments. What do you plan to do about the situation?

Statistics: Posted by Biff — Sat Apr 19, 2014 6:27 pm


Posted: April 20, 2014, 12:55 am
Did GTNP hire you to design their new map?
Image

Statistics: Posted by Steve — Sat Apr 19, 2014 5:55 pm


Posted: April 19, 2014, 11:39 pm
Katie wrote:
Steve wrote:
yellvet wrote: So, why are we even discussing this?

Because he keeps making the headlines. I find it impossible to believe that he is the only resident of Gardiner/Jardine that has ever had a bison, wolf, bear, whatever, cross his property.


Furthermore, there is the appearance that he is looking for means by which to incite conflict.
There was a FB thread (Deby Dixon's Running Wolf Page) in which a Gardiner area resident was being hammered for hazing bison off his property with a tractor. I got castigated for saying he was well within his rights to do so. I am sympathetic with private property rights and I think those rights exist whether you own property in California's Central Valley, or Ohio, or Maine, or outside Yellowstone. That said, that sympathy evaporates when a property owner repeatedly engages in activities that seem deliberately crafted specifically to harm wildlife -- from bison to wolves to bears to bighorn sheep - so far. Over and over and over again... One incident is just that - an isolated incident. This is a pattern.

~Katie


Well said, Katie.

Statistics: Posted by Connie — Sat Apr 19, 2014 4:39 pm


Posted: April 19, 2014, 9:16 pm
Steve wrote:
The gut pile was left in the yard.

Wolf bait.


or bear bait or eagle bait... but bait in any case.

~Katie

Statistics: Posted by Katie — Sat Apr 19, 2014 2:16 pm


Posted: April 19, 2014, 9:15 pm
Steve wrote:
yellvet wrote: So, why are we even discussing this?

Because he keeps making the headlines. I find it impossible to believe that he is the only resident of Gardiner/Jardine that has ever had a bison, wolf, bear, whatever, cross his property.


Furthermore, there is the appearance that he is looking for means by which to incite conflict.
There was a FB thread (Deby Dixon's Running Wolf Page) in which a Gardiner area resident was being hammered for hazing bison off his property with a tractor. I got castigated for saying he was well within his rights to do so. I am sympathetic with private property rights and I think those rights exist whether you own property in California's Central Valley, or Ohio, or Maine, or outside Yellowstone. That said, that sympathy evaporates when a property owner repeatedly engages in activities that seem deliberately crafted specifically to harm wildlife -- from bison to wolves to bears to bighorn sheep - so far. Over and over and over again... One incident is just that - an isolated incident. This is a pattern.

~Katie

Statistics: Posted by Katie — Sat Apr 19, 2014 2:15 pm


Comments are closed.