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Posted: October 23, 2014, 4:50 am
atw527 wrote:
Fascinating...I never knew hunting was permitted on National Park land. I guess this is the exception to being allowed to discharge a firearm as well.


Actually, there are quite a few lands that are under the control of the National Park Service(Dept. Of the Interior) that allows hunting, in addition, in the 60's there was actually a Elk Cull hunt in Yellowstone Park, in addition, what you would expect to be hunt free, the National Wildlife Refuge System allows some type of hunting on the majority of their parks. So just because it is National Park Service land or United States Fish and Wildlife Service lands, does not stop hunting.

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Wed Oct 22, 2014 9:50 pm


Posted: October 23, 2014, 3:15 am
Fascinating...I never knew hunting was permitted on National Park land. I guess this is the exception to being allowed to discharge a firearm as well.

Vince wrote:
In case you have too many elk, protect more the wolves and bears, don't overfeed.


I was thinking the same thing.

Statistics: Posted by atw527 — Wed Oct 22, 2014 8:15 pm


Posted: October 22, 2014, 10:24 pm
I think you are going to see it defeated, there are some pretty strong terms the Rockefeller's put on the donation of the land when the park was set up, there has been other lawsuits filed, that have failed, it will be interesting to see what happens on this one.

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:24 pm


Posted: October 22, 2014, 10:00 pm
Well put, CD. I agree completely and I don' think the points you make can be refuted.

I have no idea what Vince is trying to convey.

Statistics: Posted by NJMike — Wed Oct 22, 2014 3:00 pm


Posted: October 22, 2014, 7:02 pm
Finally !
That hunt should not be. It is the results of an extension of the park, in the 50s (according to the article).
The bottom line is that in a National Park we should not see any hunting (exept unbalanced ecosystem leading to overpopulation) nor overfeeding (unless the population is struggling).

That hunt could have been defended, at the time, by the non existence of wolves in GTNP. But the wolves reintroduction should have stopped automatically the hunt.

It should not be so complicated. The ecosystem is able to balance itself, unless you keep acting on it for private purposes.
In case you have too many elk, protect more the wolves and bears, don't overfeed.
In case you have a low wolves population, let the elk rebound, and the wolves will follow a few years later, trigging the cycle to go on by itself.

Statistics: Posted by Vince — Wed Oct 22, 2014 12:02 pm


Posted: October 22, 2014, 4:20 pm
http://www.jhnewsandguide.com/news/environmental/hunt-faces-court-battle/article_8c779ac8-f687-569f-9c3e-e2769f95e134.html
Not sure how I feel about this yet, but they raise some good points in the article. I look forward to see the outcome - whether that be some justification of the hunt that I am unaware of, or the opposite...

A couple of ironies that I see are:
Hunters and ranchers of Wyoming say their "elk herds are decimated due to wolves" yet they consider the elk population in and around the elk refuge to be way over objective - a refuge that is well within the heart of wolf country!

Also, why the feeding operation??? Seems that they are feeding them to maintain an overabundance?

I read recently that Chronic Wasting Disease has almost encroached on the elk refuge region as well - feeding operations just facilitate the spread of disease...

I especially appreciated the point in bold.


Grand Teton National Park’s one-of-a-kind annual elk hunt could some day cease to exist if two wildlife photographers prevail in federal court.
Jackson Hole residents Tim Mayo and Kent Nelson filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., Monday that aims to stop not only Grand Teton National Park’s now-underway elk hunt, but also the practice of feeding elk on public land in Northwest Wyoming.
The far-reaching claim is targeted at the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Interior Department, and alleges violations of Grand Teton National Park’s enabling legislation, the Park Service’s foundational 1916 Organic Act, the National Environmental Policy Act and the Endangered Species Act.
The lawsuit, Nelson said Tuesday, has been two years in the making.
“You can’t live in this valley for long without realizing that the feeding and the [park] hunt are inextricably linked,” Nelson said in an interview. “They are also the basis of all kinds of problems, from disease, habitat disruption, etc.”
“It is the central issue in wildlife management in this area,” he said, “and it long ago became bureaucratically gridlocked, and so it remains a persistent policy problem that has been incapable of resolution.”

Statistics: Posted by Colorado_Dave — Wed Oct 22, 2014 9:20 am


Posted: October 22, 2014, 2:02 pm
Update: I asked my son who was working in Canyon if they had ever heard what happened to this young woman; he reported that she had committed suicide by hanging. Sad.

Statistics: Posted by Steve in the Library — Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:02 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 11:37 pm
Back in 94, 95, I remember quite a few wolf mounts being brought in to put in shops for sale and I remember a few people were claiming they were "Yellowstone" wolves, which at that point in history, was not true, it was just shop keepers trying to make a buck, we get it up here in the shops around Glacier as well. I know a couple of shops down in that area that also have "Yellowstone" Grizzly bears, that were actually taken in Alaska.

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Sun Oct 19, 2014 4:37 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 11:11 pm
Dave Parker wrote:
Connie wrote: (I know you'll take a swing at me for this statement, Dave, but that's how I felt.)


No I won't Connie, we each have our feelings, I am sorry it upset you, but if I remember right that is not a Yellowstone wolf, it has been there for quite a few years.

Dave

:)

Statistics: Posted by Connie — Sun Oct 19, 2014 4:11 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 9:12 pm
Connie wrote:
(I know you'll take a swing at me for this statement, Dave, but that's how I felt.)


No I won't Connie, we each have our feelings, I am sorry it upset you, but if I remember right that is not a Yellowstone wolf, it has been there for quite a few years.

Dave

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Sun Oct 19, 2014 2:12 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 8:04 pm
Back in June while in Jackson, Wy., I was surprised to see beautiful stuffed and mounted wolves priced for several thousand dollars. I was fighting back tears as I walked out of the store. (I know you'll take a swing at me for this statement, Dave, but that's how I felt.)

Statistics: Posted by Connie — Sun Oct 19, 2014 1:04 pm


Posted: October 19, 2014, 6:11 pm
Steve wrote:
MGoBlue wrote:Point taken, Dave and Steve. And I had forgotten about the well known saying about why dog sleds are better than snowmobiles in the Arctic: You can't eat your snowmobile.

Dave, my hat's off to those three families for abiding by the principle of "eat what you kill." Another reason why I personally wouldn't shoot a wolf! ;)

Actually, I'm with the reverend on this one, "Good heavens!"


There are lots of places in the world, that canine meat is eaten as well as horse meat, here in the US, many seem to have a problem with eating those meats. There are some places I have been in the world, that I can't tell you what meat we had for dinner.

:o

Statistics: Posted by Dave Parker — Sun Oct 19, 2014 11:11 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 4:11 pm
MGoBlue wrote:
Point taken, Dave and Steve. And I had forgotten about the well known saying about why dog sleds are better than snowmobiles in the Arctic: You can't eat your snowmobile.

Dave, my hat's off to those three families for abiding by the principle of "eat what you kill." Another reason why I personally wouldn't shoot a wolf! ;)

Actually, I'm with the reverend on this one, "Good heavens!"

Statistics: Posted by Steve — Sun Oct 19, 2014 9:11 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 3:15 pm
Point taken, Dave and Steve. And I had forgotten about the well known saying about why dog sleds are better than snowmobiles in the Arctic: You can't eat your snowmobile.

Dave, my hat's off to those three families for abiding by the principle of "eat what you kill." Another reason why I personally wouldn't shoot a wolf! ;)

Statistics: Posted by MGoBlue — Sun Oct 19, 2014 8:15 am


Posted: October 19, 2014, 2:37 pm
object

Statistics: Posted by Steve — Sun Oct 19, 2014 7:37 am


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