Polarizer use in photography

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tlveik
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2019 3:59 pm

Polarizer use in photography

Post by tlveik » Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:26 am

The use of a polarizer in photography came up in another thread so I thought I'd start a thread for just that topic.

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=448
This thread has photographs that used a polarizer to remove reflections from the surface of water.

A polarizer is also very useful in enhancing the color of the sky and foliage. Here are two pictures showing that effect. The only difference between these two pictures is that one uses a polarizer and the other doesn't. The effect is very dependent on where the sun is in the sky.

Image

Image

Tom



mdtrot
Posts: 47
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2017 7:57 pm
Location: East Texas

Re: Polarizer use in photography

Post by mdtrot » Wed Oct 09, 2019 9:09 am

Thanks, great pic. The problem I have sometimes had when using my polarizing filter is that it often darkens the whole image too much, even when I try to compensate the exposure for that. It also will cause a longer exposure unless I change iso, so I also have to take that into account.



tlveik
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2019 3:59 pm

Re: Polarizer use in photography

Post by tlveik » Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:10 pm

That's true. A polarizer will darken a picture some if you don't compensate with either increased aperture, increased ISO or increased exposure time. I think about 1 or 2 stops of extra exposure is needed. Most modern cameras should be able to do that automatically though with automatic exposure.

Your camera may also have an adjustment called exposure-compensation which can add a fixed amount of extra exposure to each shot.

Tom



tlveik
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Feb 04, 2019 3:59 pm

Re: Polarizer use in photography

Post by tlveik » Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:29 pm

I just checked the exposure difference in the EXIF data on these two pictures and it is only 1/3 stop different. I am surprised actually that it was only that much.

Tom



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